Ring-billed Gull (Larus delawarensis)

Although, we see a few ring-billed gulls around all the around. But, the largest concentration occurs during migration in our area. The ring-billed gulls breed in Canada and northern Maine. They will migrate during the winter season far down as Florida and into Mexico.

They are a 3-year gull, which means it takes 3 years to reach adult plumage. The 3rd year went the plumage is different from the summer 3rd year plumage, and that there are brown-black spots around the head.

Yesterday, we were out photographing around the local area. A final stop was Lake Rico and Massasoit State Park, Taunton, Massachusetts. The day was 3 days after our first big snowstorm of the year. Because the temperature has been below freezing, the lake has started to ice over. There was a large flock of ring-billed gulls present on the lake, both in the water and on the ice.

When we parked the car and got out, but gulls started flying toward us. They would circle around and then landed on the snow. They were acting like they wanted food, so perhaps, people have been stopping and feeding the gulls.

Ring-billed Gull – Larus delarensis landing on the snow
Ring-billed Gull – Larus delarensis on the snow
Ring-billed Gull – Larus delarensis landing on the snow
Ring-billed Gull – Larus delarensis on the snow
Ring-billed Gull – Larus delarensis on the snow

The plumage range from juveniles, changing over to first-winter plumage, and all away to adults. Although, they are strong, graceful flyers and can speed along had more than 40 mph. Because they were coming in to land made them easier to track and capture images.

Ring-billed Gull – Larus delarensis in flight
Ring-billed Gull – Larus delarensis flying toward you
Ring-billed Gull – Larus delarensis coming in for a landing on the snow